St. Bernard

St. Bernard - More information about this breed

StBernard7

 

  • Other names St. Bernhardshund, Bernhardiner, Alpine Mastiff (archaic)
  • Nicknames Saint
  • Country of origin Italy / Switzerland
  • Height Male 25-27 inches (64-69 cm)
  • Height Female 23-25 inches (58-64 cm)
  • Weight Male 110-200 pounds (50-91 kg)
  • Weight Female 100-160 Pounds (45-73 kg)
  • Life Span 8-11 years
  • Litter Size 3 to 8

 

 

Description

The St. Bernard is a giant dog. The average weight of the breed can go up to 120 kilo.

The ancestors of the St. Bernard share a history with the Sennenhunds, also called Swiss Mountain Dogs or Swiss Cattle Dogs, the large farm dogs of the farmers and dairymen of the livestock guardians, herding dogs, and draft dogs as well as hunting dogs, search and rescue dogs, and watchdogs. These dogs are thought to be descendants of molosser type dogs brought into the Alps by the ancient Romans, and the St. Bernard is recognized internationally today as one of the Molossoid breeds.

The earliest written records of the St. Bernard breed are from monks at the hospice at the Great St. Bernard Pass in 1707, with paintings and drawings of the dog dating even earlier.

 

Variants

The coat can be either smooth or rough, with the smooth coat close and flat. The rough coat is dense but flat, and more profuse around the neck and legs. The coat is typically a red color with white, or sometimes a mahogany brindle with white. Black shading is usually found on the face and ears. The tail is long and heavy, hanging low. Eyes should have naturally tight lids, with “haws only slightly visible”; they are usually brown, but sometimes can be icy blue.

 

Temparament

St. Bernards, like all very large dogs, must be well socialized with people and other dogs in order to prevent fearfulness and any possible aggression or territoriality. The biggest threat to small children is being knocked over by this breed’s larger size. Overall they are a loyal and affectionate breed, and if socialized are very friendly. Because of its large adult size, it is essential that proper training and socialization begin while the St. Bernard is still a puppy, so as to avoid the difficulties that normally accompany training large dogs. An unruly St. Bernard may present problems for even a strong adult, so control needs to be asserted from the beginning of the dog’s training. While generally not as aggressive as dogs bred for protection, a St. Bernard may bark at strangers, and their size makes them good deterrents against possible intruders.

 

Health Issues

The very fast growth rate and the weight of a St. Bernard can lead to very serious deterioration of the bones if the dog does not get proper food and exercise. Many dogs are genetically affected by hip dysplasia or elbow dysplasia. They are susceptible to eye disorders called, in which the eyelid turns in or out. The breed standard indicates that this is a major fault. The breed is also susceptible to epilepsyand seizures, a heart disease called dilated cardiomyopathy, and eczema.

 

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