Scottish Deerhound

Scottish Deerhound - More information about this breed

ScottishDeerhound6

  • Other names Deerhound
  • Country of origin Scotland
  • Weight Male 85-110 lbs
  • Weight Female 75-95 lbs
  • Height Male 30-32 inches
  • Height Female 28 inches
  • Coat Wiry
  • Color Blue, brindle, fawn, gray, red, yellow
  • Litter size 4-15 pups
  • Life span 8-9 years

 

Description

The Scottish Deerhound resembles a rough-coated Greyhound. It is however, larger in size and bone. It is one of the tallest sighthounds, with a harsh 3-4 inch long coat and mane, somewhat softer beard and moustache, and softer hair on breast and belly. It has small, dark “rose” ears which are soft and folded back against the head unless held semi-erect in excitement. The harsh, wiry coat in modern dogs is only seen in self-coloured various shades of gray (blue-gray is preferred).. A white chest and toes are allowed, and a slight white tip to the tail; a white blaze on the head or a white collar are not accepted. The head is long, skull flat, with little stop and a tapering muzzle. The eyes are dark, dark brown or hazel in colour. The teeth should form a level, complete scissor bite. The long straight or curved tail, well covered with hair, should almost reach the ground.

 

Variants

Historically, Deerhounds also could be seen with true brindle, yellow, and red fawn coats, or combinations. 19th century Scottish paintings tend to indicate these colours were associated with a wire haired coat, but, with show breeders preferring a longer coat, these genes now appear to be lost

 

Temparament

The Scottish Deerhound is gentle and extremely friendly. The breed is famed for being docile and eager to please, with a bearing of gentle dignity. It is however a true sighthound which has been selected for generations to pursue game; consequently, most Deerhounds will be eager to chase. The Deerhound needs considerable exercise when young to develop properly and to maintain its health and condition. That does not mean it needs a large house to live in; however it should have regular access to free exercise in a fenced or otherwise “safe” area. Deerhounds should not be raised with access only to leash walking or a small yard, this would be detrimental to their health and development. City dwellers with conviction, however, can keep the dog both healthy and happy, as long as they are willing to take their Deerhounds to nearby parks for lengthy runs and rigorous fetching sessions within these wider running courses. Young Deerhounds can sometimes, depending on the individual, be quite destructive especially when they are not given sufficient exercise; however, the average adult Deerhound may want to spend most of the day stretched out on the floor or a couch sleeping. They do require a stimulus, preferably another Deerhound, and a large area to exercise properly and frequently. They are gentle and docile indoors and are generally good around company and children (however, due to their size, they require supervision with young children).

 

Health Issues

Scottish Deerhounds live an average of 8 1/2 to 9 years. The serious health issues in the breed include bloat; stomach or splenic torsion, called Gastric dilatation volvulus; and cystinuria

 

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